Python Support for Ion

I’ve been a bit quiet on the Ion Engine front for a few day now, mainly because I’ve been reacquainting myself with Python. As I mentioned before, I picked up a book on the language as I was considering using it as the scripting language for my engine. I’ve decided that it’s the route I want to take, so I took a look at it today to see what sort of work would have to be done.

There are two ways to integrate Python with a C++ application: compile the application as a Python module and load it into Python, or compile Python into the application and run it as an embedded interpreter. The Torque MMOKit, a package I used extensively a few years back, makes use of the first method. It caused a lot problems with packaging, since end users expect an .app or .exe file to run, not a .py file. The tool chain used a Python utility called Py2Exe to solve this, but it wasn’t without its problems and was often challenging to set up correctly. I eventually ended up moving over to the second method, which required significant work upfront but greatly simplified the overall distribution process. I plan to use the embedded method again for Ion Engine.

On the Windows platform, Python is extremely straightforward to integrate. There are pre-built .lib files included in the binary package, so no source building is required. The Mac platform is kinda in between. Apple provides Python support as part of the default libraries, but unfortunately it’s a little bit outdated at this point. I intend to use Python 3.2.x, while Snow Leopard shipped with version 2.7.x. It was fairly easy to upgrade though,and a Python.Framework is provided so I won’t need to compile source in this case either. The iPhone is a huge pain in the ass.The iPhone has very little support for Python at all; in fact until recently the App Store wouldn’t even allow embedded Python in any apps.

I haven’t been able to find compiled versions of Python 3.2 for the iPhone, so I decided to try compiling it myself. Python’s make compile settings worked just fine on my Mac, but I have no idea how to set up make to compile an iPhone library. I had to move everything over to Xcode to do this, which turned to be a lot more tedious than I expected. Eventually it all worked out though, and I was able to test a very basic “hello world” Python script in the iPhone simulator.

I intend to start integrating the Python stuff into Ion tomorrow. The end goal is to be able to control most of the game logic and world building with Python, leaving networking, rendering, scene management, etc to the core C++ engine. Since it’s a pretty big task and I’m not sure how long it will take, I plan to develop it in parallel with some of the other components I’m working on. That way I won’t get sucked into working on the one thing and burn out.

T

Advertisements

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s

%d bloggers like this: